Geographic Disparities: Broadband Style

An article from Daily Finance discussing the poor infrastructure of America’s broadband reminds me of a great piece IC student Adam Polaski did for one of our independent, social justice-focused publications, Buzzsaw Magazine.

He discusses in-depth the digital divide in the United States, including how rural and urban communities are often left out of the internet discussion. Furthermore, his piece suggests that these communities in rural and urban America could be revitalized if they were able to have greater and faster access to broadband internet.

I think it’s a great piece and further proof of the need to maintain net neutrality, which has so much support from the public (including the Christian Coalition)!

Without the ability to maintain equitable access to various online sources of information, how can the U.S. expect to move forward with an engaged group of citizens? The globalization of technology means that everyone requires internet literacy and accessibility in order to have equal opportunities in securing jobs, building strong communities, actively participating in political and social issues, and much more!

The disparities in geographic location extend beyond the poor/wealthy divide in the U.S. on an international level, as well. Those who think the internet is distributed evenly among the world’s 200+ nations are living in a utopian fantasy.

Hopefully, both independent and mainstream journalists can come together to continue to produce stories exposing the reality of internet use and net neutrality laws across the U.S. and the world. Otherwise, if the debate flounders, so might our democratic access to the web as we know it!

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